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shaj1
05-28-2008, 01:57 PM
Assalamu alaikum,

I would really appreciate if anybody can guide me in learning arabic vocabulary quickly. I have studied basic arabic grammar both nahw and sarf. I found that easier to learn than the immense task of learning vocabulary. Are there books that have the most frequently used verbs in Arabic like they do with english? What methods would you brothers recommend in learning vocabulary?

By the way this is an excellent website. May Allah (SWT) shower his mercy upon and grant the highest of Jannah to all those people who have made this site as good as it is.

Assalamu alaikum

Abu Yusuf

Amr
05-28-2008, 04:24 PM
Assalamu alaikum,

I would really appreciate if anybody can guide me in learning arabic vocabulary quickly. I have studied basic arabic grammar both nahw and sarf. I found that easier to learn than the immense task of learning vocabulary. Are there books that have the most frequently used verbs in Arabic like they do with english? What methods would you brothers recommend in learning vocabulary?

By the way this is an excellent website. May Allah (SWT) shower his mercy upon and grant the highest of Jannah to all those people who have made this site as good as it is.

Assalamu alaikum

Abu Yusuf

Wa 'alaykum as-salam warahmatullahi wabarakatuh, and welcome to the forums.

What personally worked for me many many years ago was to take something like Abul-Hashim's Arabic Made Easy, and Haywood and Nahmad's Primer on Modern Arabic Grammar (I don't recall the name off-hand but it is very popular), and I would write down the list of vocabulary after each lesson, in a pocket-size notebook (the English on one side & the Arabic on the reverse side). I would then learn these words, and then see how I fared in the exercises. I had about 2 or 3 little note books like that. I remember I made a point of jotting down the plural with every singular noun, and the imperfect (muDaari') and infinitive (maSdar) with every perfect verb (MaaDi). I would write down the verbs in a separate section of the notebook. I would carry the little notebook(s) with me and revise the vocabulary ever-so-often. In fact, I started becoming obsessed with jotting down new vocabulary. Sometimes I would give the notebook to a friend of mine and ask him to test me. Very often I could remember the exact position of the word on the page. A word like "good" I would remember حَسَن , جَيِّد and طَيِّب all in different places.

The more these words popped up in my readings the more familiar I became with them. I remember also that after Abul-Hashim, Haywood & Nahmad and som other grammar primers, I moved over to getting my vocabulary from Arabic readers comprising short stories, and so on. I started recognising more and more words in the passages that I read. In this regard I was pretty much on my own, with no teacher to help me through this stage. I think that it was the fact that I began understanding more and more that kept me going.

Obviously, different learners are more suited to different learning styles, and this was the one that worked for me, and it may not work for others. Insha Allah, hopefully others will post what it is that worked for them in learning and building vocabulary.

As for the most common words, every basic Arabic book or learning series generally tries to introduce the most common vocabulary esp. as per setting or context. Some of these books do have glossaries at back of the words used in them.

What we could do, and I saw a colleague of mine (a very accomplished Arabic teacher to nonnative Arabic learners) doing this many years ago, is to get a list (or lists) of the most common words in English (verbs and nouns), and then attempt to translate them into Arabic. This is obviously based on the assumption that what is common in one language is also common in another, which might not always hold true.

I hope you found this beneficial.

shaj1
05-29-2008, 04:32 PM
Assalamu alaikum,

May Allah SWT grant you the highest of Jannah Shaykh. I was very impressed with the prompt reply. I did buy the Haywood book long time ago (A new grammar of the Arabic Language). I stopped using it after some local learned person said to me that he thought it was not very good + it is written by orientalists(?). It is still on my shelf. If you think it is ok then I will use it again. Since you have used it Shaykh, please can you advise me how to best use it and after I complete the whole book will I be able to read books in Arabic. Or what steps I should take.

I studied parts of Nahw meer and panj ganj with a local teacher before he went but I never completed them. I can not read urdu and therefore will not be able to complete them on my own. Does Haywood cover enough of the grammar and what level is the grammar in the book?

I bought a copy of the Ihya Ulum id Deen by Imam Ghazali in Arabic. I really want to read it and the Quran in Arabic and gain benefit from them.

Jazak Allah Khairan

Abu Yusuf

Amr
05-30-2008, 12:20 AM
Assalamu alaikum,

I stopped using it after some local learned person said to me that he thought it was not very good + it is written by orientalists(?).

Wa 'alaykum as-salam warahmatullahi wabarakatuh

Well, he might have point, because I later on found that what prompted Dr. Abdullah Abbas Nadwi to write his book Learn the Language of the Holy Qur'an was what he discovered in Haywood and Nahmad's A New Grammar of the Arabic Language in terms of the feelings that they really harbour towards Islam. Dr. Abdullah Nadwi quoted the following as an example as regards their discussion of the المفعول معه in for example: سافر زيدٌ وأخاه:

"This usage is rather antique; it is found in poetry and the Qur'an, and is not recommended to the student for general use."

Also, Dr. Abdullah Nadwi feels that they could have used more positive examples on page 392 (of the London edition 1965) in relation to the name "Muhammad" other than "حسبتُ ... كذَّابا" and "أخبرْتُ حسنًا ... كذَّابًا" where the name "Muhammad" was used in place of the dotted lines.

I don't know if there are any other examples besides these two nor whether the authors have tried to change them in subsequent editions, but they should be sufficient cause for alarm bells esp. in light of how Islam and Muslims are being portrayed in mainstream media. This is despite the fact that this grammar manual was written more than 40 years ago. I can't help but to think that certain perceptions about Islam and its Prophet from the Middle Ages are still very much entrenched in the psyche of many, and have manifested themselves ever-so-often in one form or another, and sometimes even in something so innocuous as an Arabic grammar manual.

With regard to your level in Arabic grammar, if you can give me an indication as to where you have reached, then we can take it further from there. I'll be willing to chart something out for you to follow, insha Allah.

To be able to read the Qur'an in Arabic, you'd do well to purchase Dr. Abdullah Abbas Nadwi's Learn the Language of the Holy Qur'an which covers all the relevant grammar and a lot of Qur'anic vocabulary. It should serve you in good stead, insha Allah.

Often, competence in reading a particular work whether the Ihyaa' or another work is contigent on having read it under the guidance of a competent scholar who can fill in the gaps and necessary background and context. You'll often find that the teacher's method of reading and analysing the text rubs off on to the students, and this is how they often become proficient readers themselves.

Insha Allah, with the required effort, time, patience and commitment you'll soon reach your goal.

shaj1
05-31-2008, 11:58 AM
Assalamu alaikum,

I just looked over my notes from before.
From panj ganj I covered the maadi, mudari and amar. Rules of mahmooj, mu’tal. I did not do any of the extended (mazeed fihi forms(?)).

From nahw meer Jumlatul ismiah, fi’liah and insha’iya (not sure why I need to know these classifications.) Murrakab gairu mufeed (definitions), signs of a noun, verb and harf. Ism ghair mutamakkin.


Most of the above were really translations from Persian and Urdu to English with little practice.

I tried to translate from Qasasun Nabee’in using a dictionary – This was time consuming but benefited a lot (only did a few chapters). However, I noticed from your forum that I did not really do any grammatical analysis of the sentences. Just simple translation.

I hope this helps.

Abu Yusuf

Amr
06-01-2008, 04:39 PM
Assalamu alaikum,

I just looked over my notes from before.
From panj ganj I covered the maadi, mudari and amar. Rules of mahmooj, mu’tal. I did not do any of the extended (mazeed fihi forms(?)).

From nahw meer Jumlatul ismiah, fi’liah and insha’iya (not sure why I need to know these classifications.) Murrakab gairu mufeed (definitions), signs of a noun, verb and harf. Ism ghair mutamakkin.


Most of the above were really translations from Persian and Urdu to English with little practice.

I tried to translate from Qasasun Nabee’in using a dictionary – This was time consuming but benefited a lot (only did a few chapters). However, I noticed from your forum that I did not really do any grammatical analysis of the sentences. Just simple translation.

I hope this helps.

Abu Yusuf

The important think about the classical Arabic systems of grammar is that they provide you with a framework within which to understand, analyse and talk about the Arabic phenomena that you're studying. So, you'd only be able to do the analysis of something like Qasas al-Nabiyyin if you have mastered the whole or parts of the general Arabic grammatical framework. Books like the Ajurrumiyyah, 'Awaamil, Kitab al-Durus al-Nahwiyyah, etc. give you this framework on a level that is not too complicated. Obviously, the Sarf is something that you have to constantly work on, and getting down the patterns can make life considerably easy in the long run.

As for the vocabulary you can try and cover it via something like the "al-Kitab al-Asasi" Book One, or "al-'Arabiyyah bayna yadayk". But the method I told you about in an ealier post is the one that worked for me. My break-through with the grammar came after I finally began to understand the Ajurrumiyyah, and I eventually memorised which only further boosted my confidence in Arabic grammar.

So here are several things. You have to tell me where you at with them. For example, where do you stand in relation to the Ajurrumiyyah, the word patterns (10 forms of the verb, and verb conjugation according to various dama-ir - personal pronouns), as well as your vocabulary in terms of something like al-Kitab al-Asasi (Book One). This will give me a better idea, insha Allah.

If anyone else has any suggestions or recommendations, please feel free to contribute.

mospike
06-03-2008, 05:16 AM
Asalamualykum

I am trying to find a copy of the Ajurumiyya that is best..... I've been to a few bookstores here in Johannesburg and they only stock it with the marginal notes is Urdu and the print is very bad.. Perhaps i can be guided towards the required edition..

Shaykh have you come across any of the following Kitabs?

القراءة الراشدة لتعليم اللغة العربية في المدارس الإسلامية 1 أبو الحسن علي الندوي
القطوف الشهبية من الفروق اللغوية 1 العسكري
المعجم المفصل في الأدب مع الفهارس العامة 2 محمد التونجي ،الدكتور
المعجم المفصل في الإعراب 1 طاهر يوسف الخطيب
المعجم المفصل في المذكر والمؤنث 1 إميل بديع يعقوب ،الدكتور
المعجم المفصل في دقائق اللغة العربية 1 إميل بديع يعقوب ،الدكتور
المعجم المفصل في علم الصرف 1 راجي الأسمر
المعجم الوسيط 1 مجمع اللغة العربية
أدب الكاتب 1 ابن قتيبة
أربعة كتب في التصحيح اللغوي 1 الخطابي وابن بري …
ألفية ابن مالك- Pocket size 1 ابن مالك
تاج العروس من جواهر القاموس- طبعة محققة ملونة 20 الزبيدي
دليل النحو الواضح (الأجوبة) 6 محمد حماسة
شذا العرف في فن الصرف 1 احمد الحملاوي
شرح نظم مثلث قُطرب 1 عمار بن خميسي
قصص النبيين للأطفال 1 أبو الحسن علي الندوي
لسان العرب 9 ابن منظور الإفريقي
مرشد الطلاب إلى النحو والإعراب 1 علوي الحداد
معجم مقاييس اللغة 1 احمد بن زكريا
وحي القلم 1 الرافعي

the reason why i asked is because a Mufti here sells them and i wanted to know which do you feel is best,,,,

Talib
06-03-2008, 05:19 AM
bro mospike have u tried ajrummiyah translated by hamza yusuf its on pdf ??

mospike
06-03-2008, 05:21 AM
no i havent seen it

shaj1
06-04-2008, 10:07 AM
Thanks Shaykh for your advise. I have also read your blog and it is amazing and encouraging at the same time. I downloaded the ajroomiah and have found that I can understand a large portion of it. However, I am a little confused that it seems like a book of definitions. For example, where it breaks down into raf, nasb and jarr. It then lists them. (yes, I have not been through any of the classical books like the ajroomiah from start to end). It definitely seems very organised in comparison to Haywood. However, I think I will benefit if I follow your footsteps and go through Haywood from cover to cover. The content of the ajroomiah seems to be covered in the chapters on declension (i think chp 44, 45, 46) in Haywood. Am I missing the point. I have aonly covered the first 4 forms for the verbs so I will need to complete them too. Thank you for your advise.

With regards to vocabulary I think I enjoy reading more than the list approach. For some reason I find it hard - have tried it since your last discussion.

By the way I have downloaded your grammar books and will be looking over them. May Allah SWT reward you for your efforts.

Assalamualaikum

Abu Yusuf

Amr
06-07-2008, 11:03 AM
Asalamualykum

I am trying to find a copy of the Ajurumiyya that is best..... I've been to a few bookstores here in Johannesburg and they only stock it with the marginal notes is Urdu and the print is very bad.. Perhaps i can be guided towards the required edition..

Shaykh have you come across any of the following Kitabs?

القراءة الراشدة لتعليم اللغة العربية في المدارس الإسلامية 1 أبو الحسن علي الندوي (Abul-Hasan Nadwi's famous reader, in which he writes a little about himself as well. It goes without saying that Abul-Hasan Nadwi's works are all classics and higly advisable and recommended to purchase)
القطوف الشهبية من الفروق اللغوية 1 العسكري deals with subtle differences between similar meaning words in Arabic (very useful for indepth study of meanings of words. It's a classic)
المعجم المفصل في الأدب مع الفهارس العامة 2 محمد التونجي ،الدكتور (a dictionary on Arabic literature)
المعجم المفصل في الإعراب 1 طاهر يوسف الخطيب (a dictionary on i'raab or grammar analysis, and very useful for tarkeeb. Entries are arranged alphabetically, and it gives you the tarkeeb of expressions that you might not find anywhere else)
المعجم المفصل في المذكر والمؤنث 1 إميل بديع يعقوب ،الدكتور (Imeel Badi' Ya'coob is a Lebanese Christian and has done some really good service for the Arabic language and is very involved with the al-Mu'jam al-Mufassal series. This dictionary deals with masculine and feminine words in Arabic. Very useful if you're not sure about the gender of a word)
المعجم المفصل في دقائق اللغة العربية 1 إميل بديع يعقوب ،الدكتور (Deals with very subtle linguistic points in the Arabic language. Very useful for advanced study)
المعجم المفصل في علم الصرف 1 راجي الأسمر (an excellent dictionary on Sarf, and filled with Sarf tables if my memory serves me right. It might follow the Arab way of starting with أنا and نحن first instead of هُو and هما in conjugations which might be confusing if you're used to the Indo-Pak system. Cant' remember though. My copy is in South Africa)
المعجم الوسيط 1 مجمع اللغة العربية (One of the best Arabic-to-Arabic dictionaries produced by the renowned Arabic Academy of Cairo)
أدب الكاتب 1 ابن قتيبة (A classic on classical Arabic usage by the famous Ibn Qutaibah. The book is for advanced use and must-have for anyone that is serious about developing his Arabic writing skills esp. in classical Arabic or who wishes to understand the subtleties of Arabic words and expressions)
أربعة كتب في التصحيح اللغوي 1 الخطابي وابن بري … (these are 4 treatises by four different authors on the correct use of language as far as classical Arabic goes)
ألفية ابن مالك- Pocket size 1 ابن مالك (the famous 1000 verse didactic poem on Arabic grammar by Ibn Malik. A must have if you're serious about Arabic grammar. You'd need some of the commentaries otherwise it's quite cryptic and unaccessible except to the specialist)
تاج العروس من جواهر القاموس- طبعة محققة ملونة 20 الزبيدي (One of the most extensive dictionaries in Arabic and is in reality a commentary on another famous dictionary the al-Qaamoos al-Muheet. The author, az-Zabeedi is famous for two very extensive commentaries: this one and a commentary on Imam al-Ghazali's Ihyaa' 'Uloom al-Din. His dictionary is used as a reference work.)
دليل النحو الواضح (الأجوبة) 6 محمد حماسة This is the key to the exercises of the famous al-Nahw al-Waadih. Very useful.
شذا العرف في فن الصرف 1 احمد الحملاوي (this is most probably the most famous Sarf manual in the Arab world. Despite being small in size certain sections are by no means easy to access. Still it is a modern classic, and a must-have.
شرح نظم مثلث قُطرب 1 عمار بن خميسي (I opened up a thread on Qutrub's famous Muthallath in one of the forums. I myself do not have print copy of one of its commentaries. Qutrub's Muthallath is excellent for language development, and for more info see the thread)
قصص النبيين للأطفال 1 أبو الحسن علي الندوي (Abul-Hasan Nadwi's Qasas al-Nabiyyeen needs no introduction)
لسان العرب 9 ابن منظور الإفريقي (Together with az-Zabeedi's Taaj al-'Aroos these two works are the most extensive dictionaries on classical Arabic. Btw Lisanul-Arab is one of the factors that inspired the Name of this Discussion Forum. I've written a little thread on it)
مرشد الطلاب إلى النحو والإعراب 1 علوي الحداد (Very useful for tarkeeb purposes. It is not vey big and therefore not very daunting. It was written by a Yemeni scholar - from Hadramaut as the name of the author clearly indicates)
معجم مقاييس اللغة 1 احمد بن زكريا One of the best dictionaries if not the best for determining the root meanings of words, how one root can often have more than one meaning, and so on. I just purchased a 6 volume copy recently. You can also obtain it in a single volume. I quoted from it in the Qutrub thread)
وحي القلم 1 الرافعي (Mustafa Saadiq al-Raafi'i is one of the most famous modern scholars in the world of Arabic Literature, and his style of writing his highly praised and emulated by students who wish to improve their writing skills. Wahyul-Qalam is a classic and known throughout the Arabic world. Many people involved with Arabic whether as translators, teachers, etc. always would have Wahyul-Qalam by their side. A translator friend of mind has nothing but praise for Wahyul-Qalam and has a copy right next to him on his desk. It is for when you wish to work on your own writing style. Otherwise it is important for just developing one's knowledge about literary Arabic, and the anecdotes in Wahyul-Qalam are very intersting in themselves, amd make for very enjoyable reading)



Masha Allah, these are all real excellent works. The ones marked in red are the ones I have in my own personal library. Obviously, the list above cover different topics, and some are more difficult than others, and some are only used as references. As you can see I've commented on each one so as to give you an idea of what it's about. If you're are by the means then I would advise you to purchase whatever you can, because I know of people who would travel all the way to the Middle East to purchase these works, and here you have them on your doorstep. Obviously, I'm not sure about the prices, because they can be very inflated compared to their prices in the Middle East. So whatever you can manage to buy esp the smaller and single volumes then do so.

Said
02-28-2009, 07:12 PM
as-Salamu Alaykum wa Rahamtullahi wa Barakatuh,

What personally worked for me many many years ago was to take something like Abul-Hashim's Arabic Made Easy ...

Taking this advice seriously, I obtained Abul Hashim's that wonderful book and derived all of the mujarrad-salim verbs, cross checked them with Wortabet's dictionary and finally sorted them all according to their baabs (Form I).

Anyone who wishes to extend this work furhter, I can provide with the excel file.

http://qalifba.googlepages.com/ilugat1.pdf

nisarmca
07-13-2012, 12:55 PM
i want to get دليل النحو الواضح (الأجوبة books . how can i get these. are they in pdf or doc format then send me on my email nisarmca@yahoo.com, if available online then send me link.

Lugha Man
07-13-2012, 02:16 PM
Assalaamu'Alaykum

They might be able to be purchased somewhere else but I know for a fact you can get them at darrus-salaam book store in Cairo or Alexandria. They are six in number. 3 for each of the An-Nahw Al-Waadhi books. If my memory serves me correctly they were about 75 LE for the whole set of six. So that's roughly 15 USD.

While your at it, you might as well order Al Balaagha Al Waadhiha from them. Make sure you tell them you want the copy with the daleel. The daleel is in the book itself.

Wassalaamu'Alaykum

Ihsaan